Portail Québec
Databank of Official Statistics on Québec
A collaborative effort involving partner departments and agencies under the coordination of the Institut de la statistique du Québec

Definition(s)


A

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  • APPARENT CONSUMPTION -- BIOFOOD INDUSTRY
    • The gross supply of a product minus its multiple uses before final consumption. Thus, the gross supply of food consists in the summation of data with respect to production, importing and the total quantity in stock at year beginning. The multiple uses, other than final consumption, refer to any use of the said product at an intermediate production stage, exports, losses, and quantity in stock at year end.


      Total consumption for the whole of Québec is obtained by multiplying the figure for Canadian apparent consumption per capita, generally expressed in kilograms or litres, by the population of Québec on July 1 each year. This statistic infers that Québec consumers behave in exactly the same manner as Canadian consumers.

B

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  • BALANCE OF TRADE IN BIOFOOD SECTOR
    • Biofood sector import and export statistics are taken from the monthly custom-based data produced by the International Trade Division (ITD) of Statistics Canada (SC). They measure cross-border movements of goods according to the Harmonized System (HS). The HS comprises disaggregated categories common to numerous countries, making it possible to study given products and markets but not to measure the external balance or the goods and services trade balance. In order to do so, a series of adjustments with regard to the coverage or spreading of certain costs should be used. In addition, international exchanges of services and business are not included.


      Custom-based data are valued at border prices. Under that method, international goods exports are recorded at their f.o.b. prices at the point of exit; the latter includes all production costs at the factory and any other costs incurred between leaving the factory and the point of exit from Canada, including domestic shipping. Imports are valued at their f.o.b. prices at the point of direct shipment to Canada. Freight and insurance costs in bringing the goods to Canada from the point of direct shipment are excluded.

C

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  • CASH RENT AND SHARE RENT – AGRICULTURE
    • Expenditure on rent paid for land and buildings leased from the government or private sector (including other farmers). Includes property taxes of a property rented from someone else and grazing fees. Excludes machinery rental and quota costs.

      Share rent expenditure is estimated on the rent amount, which is the share of farm-produced products paid by the tenant to the farm owner (crop share agreement).
  • CROP YEAR
    • A twelve-month period, comprising the different stages of the production cycle, over which a commodity crop is produced.
  • CUSTOM WORK -- AGRICULTURE
    • Contract work and machine hire expenses.

E

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  • ESTABLISHMENT – PROCESSING SECTOR
    • In the processing sector, an establishment is the smallest operating unit, usually a factory, able to provide data on its activity.
      Since 2000, the survey universe has expanded to all manufacturing units. Previously, only incorporated manufacturing companies which had employees and sales of manufactured goods of at least $30,000 were taken into account.

F

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  • FARM OPERATING EXPENSES
    • Any costs incurred by agricultural operators for the goods and services required for agricultural production. Among the main expense categories are: commercial feed for livestock, cash wages, interest, and machine repairs. If direct rebates are given to farmers to reduce the cost of certain inputs, the net balance of these inputs is used in the computation of net income.
  • FARM PRICE
    • Price received by the producer at the time of the first transaction. It necessarily reflects the marketing costs assumed by the producer up to the time of the sale, i.e. at the time of the changing of the title of ownership. However, if an intermediary comes between the producer and the consumer, the amount received by the producer will correspond to the net amount paid by the buyer. At no time may deductions made by the buyer be taken into consideration.
  • FARM PRODUCERS, NUMBER OF
    • Variable not to be confused with the number of agricultural operations or farms. Since the 1991 Census of Agriculture, agricultural operators are defined as men and women who make the day-to-day management decisions on Canadian farms or agricultural operations. Therefore, it appears that there can be more than one operator in a given agricultural operation.

G

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  • GOVERNMENT FARM PROGRAM
    • Direct payment to farm producers to encourage production, compensate them for low market prices, stabilize their incomes, reduce farm input expenses or compensate them for damage caused by extreme weather, illness or other reasons. Generally these programs, under the terms of which the direct payments are made, are financed by federal, provincial and municipal governments on the one hand and by producers on the other. Among the most important ones are: the Net Income Stabilization Account (NISA), the Gross Revenue Insurance Plan (GRIP), crop insurance, the Farm Income Stabilization Insurance Program, and dairy product subsidies.
  • GOVERNMENT REBATE -- AGRICULTURE
    • All payments made directly to producers under federal, provincial, and municipal programs designed to reduce expenses.

I

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  • INCOME-IN-KIND -- AGRICULTURE
    • Measurement of the agricultural products consumed by operators and their families. These products are assessed at current market prices in order to reflect as faithfully as possible the sums the operator would have received if he had sold them on the market.

M

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  • MARKET CASH RECEIPTS -- AGRICULTURE
    • Receipts corresponding to the marketed volume evaluated at the farm price. The sale of agricultural products and farm woodlot products does not include sales between the farm operators of a same province.

N

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  • NET CASH INCOME -- AGRICULTURE
    • Total cash receipts minus farm operating expenses after rebates.

P

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  • PAYMENT MECHANISM OF DAIRY FARMERS
    • Mechanism to determine, according to the dairy convention in force August 1, 1997, the price of milk produced in a province based on prices within and outside the quota. In Québec, as in other Canadian provinces, the in-quota price is the result of negotiations between milk producer representatives and processors. The over-quota price is determined by the Canadian Dairy Commission in accordance with market forces.
      Each producer has a daily production which he has the option to override. Any production below is paid in-quota price, while the surplus is paid at over-quota price.
  • PERSONAL DISPOSABLE INCOME -- BIOFOOD INDUSTRY
    • Personal income remaining after payment to government of direct taxes from persons and other fees, licences and permit costs (including hospital and medical insurance premiums, but excluding indirect taxes).
  • PERSONAL INCOME -- BIOFOOD INDUSTRY
    • The sum of all incomes received by persons residing in Québec, whether factor earnings from current production or current transfers from governments and other sectors. Capital gains and losses are also excluded.
  • PRIMARY SECTOR
    • Includes agricultural, fishing, forestry, mining, quarrying and oil extraction industries.

Q

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  • QUANTITIES PRODUCED -- AGRICULTURE
    • This notion refers to the quantities produced in the province or country. They reflect, for example, the quantities of meat from Québec-bred livestock, regardless of the place of slaughter (slaughter establishment of origin). Unfinished livestock that are taken out of Québec to be fattened elsewhere are also taken into account in the calculation. The quantities produced are expressed in carcass weight, and equivalent costs.

R

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  • REALIZED NET INCOME -- AGRICULTURE
    • Cash net income minus depreciation charges and plus income-in-kind.

S

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  • SHIPMENT VALUE OF OWN PRODUCTS
    • Net sale value of own products and amount received for custom work done on materials owned by other establishments.

      Since 2000, the survey universe has extended to all manufacturing units. In previous years however, only incorporated manufacturing companies which had employees and sales of manufactured goods of at least $30,000 were taken into account.

      Since 2004 however, Statistics Canada has changed its approach regarding annual surveys and now publishes annual manufacturing statistics using an eligibility threshold. This threshold, based on manufacturing shipments, is the key element of the new approach. It varies from one province to another and from one industry to another. Below these thresholds are small manufacturers who are excluded from the survey in order to reduce the response burden.

T

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  • TOTAL CASH RECEIPTS -- AGRICULTURE
    • Receipts taking into account both market cash receipts and government programs.
  • TOTAL NET INCOME -- AGRICULTURE
    • Income obtained by adding realized net income and the value of changes in inventories.

V

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  • VALUE OF CHANGES IN INVENTORIES -- AGRICULTURE
    • Value of the variation of agricultural commodities owned by the producers between the beginning and the end of the calendar year. Regardless of whether this value is positive or negative, added to the total cash receipts and income-in-kind, it represents the annual value of production. It is estimated for the following agricultural commodities: wheat, oats, barley, rye, corn, flaxseed, soya, potatoes, tobacco, beef, veal, mutton and lamb, pork, hen, chicken and turkey.

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Classification(s)


  • Système de classification des industries de l'Amérique du Nord SCIAN
    • Le Système de classification des industries de l'Amérique du Nord (SCIAN) est un système de classification des activités économiques qui a été conçu par les organismes statistiques du Canada, du Mexique et des États-Unis pour remplacer graduellement les systèmes en vigueur dans chacun de ces pays, à savoir la Classification type des industries (1980) du Canada, la Classification des activités et des produits (1994) du Mexique, la Standard Industrial Classification (1987) des États-Unis et la Classification des activités économiques du Québec. Le SCIAN est un système global qui s'applique à toutes les activités économiques. Ce système commun de classification s'appuie sur un cadre conceptuel fondé sur la production ou l'offre. Les établissements y sont groupés par classe en fonction de la similitude des procédés de production, tels que la structure des intrants et les qualifications de la main-d'oeuvre. La relation entre la CTI 1980 et le SCIAN Canada est illustrée par des tables de concordance. Ces tableaux mettent en évidence les différences et les similarités entre les classes les plus détaillées des deux classifications, information qui est utile quand les données sont transposées d'une classification à l'autre.

      Source : Statistique Canada (12-501-XPF).

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